10.3.17

YouTubers in the Media

I remember when I first majorly started to love YouTube. The people I watched, made videos of their passions because they really enjoyed it, not because it would make them a lot of money or help them become a celebrity. Because of this, it made it feel like they were more like online friends, than someone completely above you. I also remember how happy/excited/proud I felt, when my favourite YouTubers at the time, first made it into the mainstream media outlets, because it just wasn't a thing that really happened back then, but fast forward 7 years and it's now a thing of the norm, but maybe not always as positive as it initially was.
The Guardian recently made the ridiculous claim that Zoe Sugg aka Zoella is to blame for the decline in teenage literacy. Even though, I don't find Zoe's books to be my cup of tea personally, to try and use her as a scapegoat and blame her for the decline in teenage literacy for the whole of the UK, is just absurd. In my opinion, I don't think schools actually do enough to encourage and inspire young adults to read. I know my school never did and it wasn't until I left school, that I majorly started to read lots of books because I actually enjoyed it, not because I had to. This is not the first time that mainstream media have made ridiculous, negative claims about YouTubers, and it most definitely won't be the last. However, this article provoked a huge online reaction from viewers and online creators, and also led to Dodie making a video in response to the constant ridicule, that YouTubers receive from the media. At the end of the video, she suggested that people should make video responses with their thoughts and feelings on the subject and as YouTube isn't my forte, I thought I'd write a post instead.


I really enjoyed Dodie's video and I feel like she made some excellent points. YouTube videos have changed people's lives for the better. In the video, she talks about how people that suffer from issues such as acne have learnt to love and accept themselves because of YouTubers such as Melanie Murphy and Zoella, how people are now experimenting with stop motion and lighting techniques after watching the likes of Kick The Pj and lastly, not forgetting the likes of Shane Dawson, Ingrid Nelson and Kingsley that help LGBTQ+ individuals know that they are not alone and help them to understand that there is a world out there, that will accept them for who they are.

All these examples really made me appreciate YouTube for what it does and how it helps and impacts people's lives. Then, I thought about which videos have helped me. All of those videos I watched to help me realise what an abusive relationship is, realising what consent is and knowing that I CAN say no. I also remember when I first starting struggling severely with anxiety and I watched a video Zoella had made regarding her experience and after, I just sobbed and sobbed, because for the first time, I didn't feel so alone. Thank god a platform like this exists!

However, as Dodie is a YouTuber herself, I feel like her thoughts and views are slightly somewhat biased. Yes, I totally agree that countless media outlets constantly take something completely positive and turn it into something very sad and negative, but I think we also need to remember that mainstream media have ALWAYS done this. Think of any celebrity, big or small. At some point, I bet there has been an untruthful, negative article written about them. Every week, gossip magazines are printed. How many of those articles are completely factual? Very little, I'd say. But I think, when something negative is printed about a YouTuber, everyone takes it very personally, like it's an attack on all YouTubers, but this is not the case. I think there comes a point, when the line between YouTuber and celebrity becomes incredibly blurred and with that fame, comes good attention and bad. It's just the reality of it. For a long time, the mainstream media were painted to be very dim when it came to YouTubers and their outreach, but I don't think this is the case anymore. They understand that these creators have a lot of viewers and a lot of fans, so they know using their name will improve their readership, which it always does.

Ultimately, I think it's very easy for everyone that supports YouTubers, whether you are a viewer or an online creator yourself, to get angry at negative attention like this, but this is exactly why they write things like this and why they will continue to write things like this in the future, for those clicks. 

1.3.17

Top Five of the Week: YouTube

Lately I seem to be watching YouTube less and less, but here are five videos that I've loved from the past week! (I'd like this to maybe be a weekly thing, but my subscription box is usually pretty bleak, so we shall see)




001: Alfie Deyes and Emma Blackery talk YouTube Money, Books & More.
As a non YouTuber myself, I find videos like this incredibly interesting. I feel that those that haven't experienced life as a YouTuber can be very quick to judge at times, myself included, so I'm all about videos that set the record straight. This is a must watch, even if you're not a fan of the likes of Emma or Alfie. This video also inspired me to write one of my latest blog posts - Let's Talk About YouTube (&Blogging).




002: Cayleigh Maloye covers La La Land's 'Audition Song' 
I really like La La Land, I'm just not sure if I love it and get the hype everyone gives it. However, the soundtrack is beautiful, and after seeing the film, I became obsessed and had it on repeat for w e e k s. I feel like most days there is another La La Land cover in my subscription box, but I think because I have such a high expectation of how the songs should sound, I don't really love many of them, but this one is incredible and I can't stop listening to it!



003: Mark Ferris talks about becoming comfortable in his own skin
As someone who is pretty self conscious, I really loved this video and the important message it sends out; that everyone should be able to wear whatever they feel comfortable in, regardless of what other people think. He also touched on the comments he sometimes receives, regarding men using products and clothes that are deemed for woman, and how to deal with comments from close-minded individuals. I really enjoy videos like this because I'm a stickler for listening to negative comments. I wish I could have watched videos like this when I was a teenager, I feel like my mindset would be completely different.



004: The Michalaks announce their pregnancy 
The Michalaks have to be one of my favourite YouTubers, and one of the only vlogging channels I watch; the way that the vlogs are shot and edited is just incredible. Back in the summer, Hannah wrote the most heartbreakingly beautiful blog post about her miscarriage, so watching their announcement video of their new pregnancy made me so emotional. Hannah has also uploaded another video where she talks more about her pregnancy so far and wrote a blog post where she talks about pregnancy after a loss. It's so lovely to see her happy after a really tough time!




005: Dodie Clark responds to YouTube hate in the media. 
I feel like most days now, I see more and more main stream media outlets bashing and outing YouTubers. This is a very interesting and thought provoking video and I agree with most of the points made. I really love videos like this, that get people talking and sharing their opinions! At the end of the video, Dodie tells her audience to make video responses, but as YouTube is not my thing, I think I may write a post in response to it soon.

Which videos have you loved watching the past week?

S
x

27.2.17

What The Ribbons And Pins Meant At The Oscars

As last night was the 89th Academy Awards ceremony, I stayed up until nearly 6am to watch them play out live. And yes, I'm definitely paying for it today, with the extremely bloodshot eyes and intense tiredness. One of the biggest questions I had last night (apart from what the hell went to wrong during the Best Picture award?!?!) was what do all of these ribbons and pins that the attendees were wearing mean? 

Emma Stone Oscars 2017 Planned Parenthood

001: Emma Stone (La La Land) and Dakota Johnson (Fifty Shades) show their support for Planned Parenthood by wearing a gold pin, as the organisation defend its federal funding.



002: Screenwriter Tarell Alvin McCraney (Moonlight) wore a red ribbon in support of the fight against AIDS. Casey Affleck (Manchester by the Sea) also showed his support by wearing a smaller, bejeweled version.



003: Jackie Chan brought two toy pandas as his dates because he is "the panda ambassador" and one of his pandas wore a UNICEF pin.



004: Costume designer Colleen Attwood (Fantastic Beasts & Where to Find Them) wore GLAAD's (Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation) blue ampersand. The symbol is meant to "stand with all communities subject to discrimination – including women, Muslims, immigrants, and LGBTQ people."



005: The blue ACLU ribbon, which was dubbed as being the hottest accessory at this years Academy Awards, was worn by various attendees last night: Lin Manuel Miranda, Ruth Negga and Emma Stone, just to name a few. It was a way that everyone could show their support in the wake of Trump's controversial travel ban. "For almost 100 years, the ACLU has worked to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties guaranteed by the Constitution and laws of the United States."


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